Category Archives: di202

Sprung

For some reason I thought I should find an image called "Robot Love" to illustrate this post. Here it is. (Some rights reserved by Aaron Webb on Flickr)

The topic this week in di202 (ably led by Lindsay) was about deception online, particularly with how it relates to digital identity and the formation of relationships online.

Here’s what I find fascinating about this topic: I have a sense that our formation of relationships online is fundamentally different than our formation of relationships IRL because of the vast differences between those two contexts. Okay, after re-reading that, I realize it doesn’t sound like a very bold statement. Let’s see if I can dig deeper. . . Continue reading Sprung

DI202, 6 Days and Counting

Well, it’s officially less than one week until classes start, and I’m a little further with preparing for #DI202 (That’s my chosen hashtag for AMST202: Identity and Citizenship in the Digital Age which I’ll be teaching this spring.) Here’s where things stand:

  • I’m holding firm at a whopping SIX students right now. I was up to ten last week which I was pretty excited about, but a with the semester starting up I guess there’s a lot of schedule juggling going on. Maybe I’ll gain a few more before next Tuesday. Hopefully, I won’t lose anymore!
  • I’ve decided to scale back the number of topics for the class. More on this below. Continue reading DI202, 6 Days and Counting

Welcoming 2012, in which I stress out a little and beg for help (a lot)

by LukasO on Flickr.

In typical Martha-fashion, a new semester is about to start and I feel only about 20% prepared. Not only do I have a number of large DTLT projects underway (including the ePortfolio and online learning initiative — both of which I need to write updates about), I’m embarking on teaching a new course in the American studies program at UMW this spring. The class is a sophomore seminar on “Identity and Citizenship in the Digital Age.” I am equally parts excited and terrified. I’m neither a sociologist nor a psychologist nor a political scientist, so I’ve been struggling with the best way to approach the topics of “identity” and “citizenship” while staying honest. In the end, I’ll approach it like I do most everything in my life: like a hack. ­čÖé Continue reading Welcoming 2012, in which I stress out a little and beg for help (a lot)